spiral loading graphic
Person in a hospital bed

Alcohol Use Disorder: Short- and Long-Term Consequences

Nov 30, 2021
Recovery
It has been said that, for a person with alcohol use disorder, “one drink is too many and a thousand is never enough.” Here you'll learn more about the consequences.

According to the 2019 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, nearly 15 million people in the U.S. (age 12 and older) had alcohol use disorder. The CDC divides the negative impact of excessive alcohol use into two categories: “short-term” and “long-term” health risks.

Short-Term Health Risks are defined as “the immediate effects of excessive alcohol use that increase the risk of harmful health conditions.” This includes:

Long-Term Health Risks are defined by excessive alcohol use over time, which “can lead to the development of chronic diseases and other serious problems.” This includes:  

  • Weakened immune system
  • Various types of cancer, such as breast, mouth, throat, esophagus, voice box, liver or colon
  • Memory-related issues, such as dementia or poor school performance
  • Mental health diagnoses, such as depression and anxiety
  • Social problems related to family, career or unemployment
  • Other medical concerns like high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke or liver disease

Even in small quantities, alcohol can negatively impact mood, balance, memory and reasoning ability. And—once it’s consumed—alcohol really does go “straight to your head.” It is quickly absorbed by the blood and rapidly spreads throughout the body—affecting almost every organ system.

 

If you’re interested in pursuing recovery from alcohol use disorder, First Step Recovery can help. Contact us today to learn more!

Person in a hospital bed

Alcohol Use Disorder: Short- and Long-Term Consequences

Nov 30, 2021
Recovery
It has been said that, for a person with alcohol use disorder, “one drink is too many and a thousand is never enough.” Here you'll learn more about the consequences.

According to the 2019 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, nearly 15 million people in the U.S. (age 12 and older) had alcohol use disorder. The CDC divides the negative impact of excessive alcohol use into two categories: “short-term” and “long-term” health risks.

Short-Term Health Risks are defined as “the immediate effects of excessive alcohol use that increase the risk of harmful health conditions.” This includes:

Long-Term Health Risks are defined by excessive alcohol use over time, which “can lead to the development of chronic diseases and other serious problems.” This includes:  

  • Weakened immune system
  • Various types of cancer, such as breast, mouth, throat, esophagus, voice box, liver or colon
  • Memory-related issues, such as dementia or poor school performance
  • Mental health diagnoses, such as depression and anxiety
  • Social problems related to family, career or unemployment
  • Other medical concerns like high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke or liver disease

Even in small quantities, alcohol can negatively impact mood, balance, memory and reasoning ability. And—once it’s consumed—alcohol really does go “straight to your head.” It is quickly absorbed by the blood and rapidly spreads throughout the body—affecting almost every organ system.

 

If you’re interested in pursuing recovery from alcohol use disorder, First Step Recovery can help. Contact us today to learn more!

Additional Wisdom & Stories

Additional Wisdom & Stories

Close X
Download any and all of the We Care More "Stop the Stigma" series ebooks and infographics.
Thank you!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form. Please try again. If the issue continues, please contact us.